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Supporting English-Language Learners During Language Arts Instruction

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Q'Ristien Berrian

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Tampa

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Jolyn Blank

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Nearly half of the students in my first-grade classroom are dual-language learners in various stages of English language acquisition. Previous research recommended that teachers of young children cultivate bilingualism; however, many early childhood educators find it challenging to provide effective instruction for English language learners (ELLs) while also meeting grade level English Language Arts (ELA) standards. The purpose of this study is to gain understanding of ways teachers support dual-language learners in the ELA domain. I employed research-based strategies to support language learning in small group instruction in order to describe the students' responses to instruction. Data sources were audio/video recordings of small group instruction, student assessments, and student work samples. I expect to find variance in the student's responses to my teaching strategies, and to demonstrate how I modified instruction in relation to students' responses. Understanding this variance is important in terms of increasing the quality of instruction for dual-language learners in early childhood education classrooms

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Supporting English-Language Learners During Language Arts Instruction

Nearly half of the students in my first-grade classroom are dual-language learners in various stages of English language acquisition. Previous research recommended that teachers of young children cultivate bilingualism; however, many early childhood educators find it challenging to provide effective instruction for English language learners (ELLs) while also meeting grade level English Language Arts (ELA) standards. The purpose of this study is to gain understanding of ways teachers support dual-language learners in the ELA domain. I employed research-based strategies to support language learning in small group instruction in order to describe the students' responses to instruction. Data sources were audio/video recordings of small group instruction, student assessments, and student work samples. I expect to find variance in the student's responses to my teaching strategies, and to demonstrate how I modified instruction in relation to students' responses. Understanding this variance is important in terms of increasing the quality of instruction for dual-language learners in early childhood education classrooms