Creator

Casey Berkhouse

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HNTB Corporation

Publication Date

January 2005

Abstract

EXECUTIVE SUMMARYThis report summarizes data for assessing the status of the Tooth Cave ground beetle (Rhadine persephone), a federally listed endangered species. Only the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) can determine the recovery and regulatory status of this species, and this report is intended as tool for assessing both. Data reviewed for this report were gleaned from USFWS files; additional information was obtained from the Mike Walsh (Texas Cave Conservancy), James R. Reddell (Texas Memorial Museum, The University of Texas as Austin), Mark Sanders (City of Austin), and Rose Farmer (Travis County). The Tooth Cave ground beetle was listed as a federally endangered species in 1988. Threats facing the species are associated primarily with human activities, especially urban development. In 1994 the USFWS prepared a Recovery Plan for this species and several other endangered karst invertebrate species. At that time the USFWS believed that the prospect for complete recovery and delisting of Tooth Cave ground beetles was uncertain. The Recovery Plan includes recovery criteria that should be met in order for Tooth Cave ground beetles to be considered for downlisting from endangered to threatened. The recovery criteria are intended to serve as recommendations and are not mandatory steps toward achieving downlisting or recovery. The recovery criteria include the recommendation that multiple karst fauna areas (KFAs) should be protected in each karst fauna region (KFR) within the species' range. Tooth Cave ground beetles were known from only two caves when listed as endangered. The Recovery Plan lists the species as occurring in 23 karst features and tentatively identified from another four. For this report, "confirmed" records of Tooth Cave ground beetle occurrence were defined as those for which documentation apparently attributable to James R. Reddell was found in USFWS files and for which Mr. Reddell provided confirmation specific to this report; "tentative" records of occurrence are those for which either but not both forms of confirmation were obtained. Based on these definitions, Tooth Cave ground beetles have been confirmed from 46 karst features and are tentatively confirmed from another six features. Most of these features are in Williamson County and the Cedar Park KFR; the Jollyville Plateau KFR is the only other KFR from which confirmed or tentative records of occurrence are documented. Five karst features from which Tooth Cave ground beetles have not been collected have been referred to as, or implied to contain, potential habitat for the species. One of these features is in the McNeil/Round Rock KFR and the other four are in the Cedar Park KFR. The occurrence of troglobitic species was most often cited as an indicator for the potential presence of Tooth Cave ground beetles. An un-described Rhadine species, often referred to as "Rhadine new species" or something similar, is reported from 36 karst features mostly located in Williamson County and in the Cedar Park KFR. Nineteen of these features are confirmed or tentatively confirmed Tooth Cave ground beetle collection locations. Some collections formerly assigned to "Rhadine ?subterranea" may now be considered Rhadine new species. Of the 57 karst features considered as confirmed or tentatively confirmed Tooth Cave ground beetle collection sites, or considered as containing habitat potentially suitable for the species, three features are destroyed and 48 features are within 27 preserves or tracts managed at least in part to protect Tooth Cave ground beetles. Preserve size varies considerably; the largest preserve discussed in this report occupies about 494 acres and the smallest occupies about 0.05 acres. One tract of land owned by Travis County and containing two of the cave entrances is only about 0.0057 acres and is completely surrounded by privately owned land. Tooth Cave ground beetle preserve and tract owners include public and private entities, and the management of beetle caves and habitats varies. In the Cedar Park KFR, 33 caves considered as confirmed or tentatively confirmed Tooth Cave ground beetle collection sites, or considered as containing habitat potentially suitable for the species, are contained within 17 preserves managed at least in part for the protection of the species. Tooth Cave ground beetles have reportedly been observed as recently as 2003 in eight of the Cedar Park KFR caves. In the Jollyville Plateau KFR, 15 caves considered as confirmed or tentatively confirmed Tooth Cave ground beetle collection sites, or considered as containing habitat potentially suitable for the species, are contained within 10 preserves, setbacks, or parcels managed at least in part for the protection of the species. Tooth Cave ground beetles have reportedly been observed as recently as December 2004 in one of the Jollyville Plateau KFR caves. Documents found in USFWS files suggest that nine KFAs known to contain Tooth Cave ground beetles have been delineated to some extent. Six of these possible KFAs are located in the Cedar Park KFR and three are in the Jollyville Plateau KFR. Documentation and references for these claims are typically not provided, but most of these claims appear to be based solely on hydrogeologic studies. While some of these studies do suggest that specific karst features are not connected and probably occur in separate KFAs, no study describing the delineation of a KFA's full subsurface and surface extents as described in the Recovery Plan was found in USFWS files. None of the nine possible KFAs appear to have been delineated in a manner consistent with the description of KFAs provided in the Recovery Plan. Open Access - Permission by Publisher See Extended description for more information.

Keywords

A.J. and B.L. Wilcox Cave (Williamson County, Texas, United States), Amber Cave (Travis County, Texas, United States), Animal Canyon Cave (Williamson County, Texas, United States), Ant Riot Cave (Williamson County, Texas, United States), B. A. B. E. Pit (Texas, United States), Bad Air Fissure (Texas, United States), Barton Springs (Austin, Texas, United States), Beard Ranch Cave (Travis County, Texas, United States), Big Oak Cave (Williamson County, Texas, United States), Blue Wasp Cave (Williamson County, Texas, United States), Bluewater II Pit (Texas, United States), Bluewater Pit (Texas, United States), Boulevard Cave (Texas, United States), Broken Arrow Cave (Texas, United States), Buttercup Blowhole Cave (Texas, United States), Buttercup Bone Cave (Williamson County, Texas, United States), Buttercup Creek Cave (Texas, United States), Buttercup Drain Cave (Texas, United States), Buttercup Wind Cave (Williamson County, Texas, United States), Cedar Elm Sink (Texas, United States), Clark Cave (Williamson County, Texas, United States), Comanche Trail Cave (Travis County, Texas, United States), Connection Cave (Texas, United States), Convoluted Canyon Cave (Texas, United States), Crumley's Cave (Texas, United States), Dead Dauber Cave (Williamson County, Texas, United States), Disbelievers Cave (Travis County, Texas, United States), Discovery Well (Texas, United States), Eluvial Cave (Travis County, Texas, United States), Fern Pit (Travis County, Texas, United States), Gallifer Cave (Travis County, Texas, United States), Godzilla Cave (Williamson County, Texas, United States), Good Friday Cave (Texas, United States), Grimace Cave (Texas, United States), Harvestman Cave (Williamson County, Texas, United States), Hide-a-Way Cave (Texas, United States), Homestead Cave (Travis County, Texas, United States), Ilex Cave (Texas, United States), Japygid Cave (Travis County, Texas, United States), Jollyville Jewel Cave (Travis County, Texas, United States), Jollyville Plateau Cave (Travis County, Texas, United States), Jug Cave (Texas, United States), Kamikaze Cave (Texas, United States), Kretschmarr Cave (Travis County, Texas, United States), Kretschmarr Double Pit (Travis County, Texas, United States), LakeLine Cave (Texas, United States), Lakeline Mall Well Trap No.6 (Williamson County, Texas, United States), Lamm Cave (Travis County, Texas, United States), Marigold Cave (Texas, United States), May B A Cave (Williamson County, Texas, United States), McDonald Cave (Travis County, Texas, United States), MWA Cave (Travis County, Texas, United States), Nelson Ranch Cave (Texas, United States), North Root Cave (Travis County, Texas, United States), Northside Cave (Travis County, Texas, United States), Owl Eyes Cave (Travis County, Texas, United States), Pat's Pit (Williamson County, Texas, United States), Persimmon Well Cave (Williamson County, Texas, United States), Pig Snout Cave (Williamson County, Texas, United States), Primrose Cave (Williamson County, Texas, United States), Puzzle Pit Cave (Travis County, Texas, United States), Raccoon Cave (Texas, United States), Rolling Rock Cave (Texas, United States), Root Cave (Travis County, Texas, United States), Salamander Squeeze (Texas, United States), Spider Cave (Travis County, Texas, United States), Stone Well Cave No.1 (Williamson County, Texas, United States), Stone Well Cave No.2 (Williamson County, Texas, United States), Stovepipe Cave (Travis County, Texas, United States), T. W. A. S. A. Cave (Texas, United States), Tardus Hole Cave (Travis County, Texas, United States), Testudo Tube (Texas, United States), Tooth Cave (Travis County, Texas, United States), Treehouse Cave (Texas, United States), Twisted Elm Cave (Travis County, Texas, United States), Two Holer Cave (Texas, United States), Two Trunks Cave (Travis County, Texas, United States), Uncorked Cave (Williamson County, Texas, United States), Underline Cave (Texas, United States), Whitewater Cave (Texas, United States), United States, Geology

Description

1 online resource

Subject: topical

Geology

Subject: geographic

United States

Language

English

Type

Text

Genre

Reports, Technical

Format

application/pdf

Identifier

K26-04293

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