Title

Variability of karstic permeability between unconfined and confined aquifers, Grand Canyon region, Arizona

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Publisher

GeoScienceWorld

Publication Date

May 2000

Abstract

Most of the ground water in the Grand Canyon region circulates to springs in the canyon through the thick, deeply buried, karstified Cambrian-Mississippian carbonate section. These rocks are collectively called the lower Paleozoic carbonates and comprise the Redwall-Muav aquifer where saturated. The morphologies of the caves in the Grand Canyon are primarily a function of whether the carbonates are unconfined or confined, a distinction that has broad significance for ground-water exploration and which appears to be generally transferable to other carbonate regions. Caves in unconfined high-gradient environments tend to be highly localized, partially saturated, simple tubes, whereas those in confined low-gradient settings are saturated 2- or even 3-dimensional mazes. The highly heterogeneous, widely spaced conduits in the unconfined settings make for difficult drilling targets, whereas the more ubiquitously distributed mazes in confined settings are far easier to target. The distinctions between the storage characteristics within the two classes are more important. There is minimal ground-water storage in the unconfined systems because cave passages tend to be more widely spaced and are partially drained. In contrast, there is maximum storage in the saturated mazes in the confined systems. Consequently, system responses to major storm recharge events in the unconfined systems are characterized by flow-through hydraulics. Spring discharge from the unconfined systems tends to be both flashy and highly variable from season to season, but total dissolved solids are small. In contrast, the pulse-through hydraulics in the artesian systems cause fluctuations in spring discharge to be highly moderated and, in the larger basins, remarkably steady. Both total dissolved solids and temperatures in the waters from the confined aquifers tend to be elevated because most of the water is derived from storage. The large artesian systems that drain to the Grand Canyon derive water from areally extensive, deep basins where the water

Notes

Environmental and Engineering Geoscience, Vol. 6, no. 2 (2000-05-01).

Keywords

Arizona, Carbonate Rocks, Kaibab Formation, Grand Canyon, Paleozoic, United States, Ground Water, Permian, Sedimentary Rocks

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RDA

Subject: topical

Arizona; Carbonate Rocks; Kaibab Formation; Grand Canyon; Paleozoic; United States; Ground Water; Permian; Sedimentary Rocks

Type

Article

Genre

serial

Identifier

SFS0055968_00001

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