Title

The Evolution of Paleolithic Art

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Publisher

Scientific American, a division of Nature America, Inc.

Publication Date

February 1968

Abstract

The earliest forms of art, at least among those art forms that can be dated with any certainty, were created in Europe between 30,000 and 10,000 B.C. They belong to a time before the oldest civilizations and the earliest agriculture-the Upper Paleolithic period at the end of the last continental glaciation. Paleolithic art has manifested itself in two principal forms: engraved or sculptured objects found by the thousands in excavations from the Urals to the Atlantic, and the awe-inspiring decorations of more than 100 caves in France and Spain. It has now been studied for nearly a century, and such caves as Lascaux and Altamira have become as well known as the most famous art works of historic times.

Notes

Scientific American, Vol. 218, no. 2 (1968-02).

Keywords

Cave Paintings, Caves, Prehistoric Art, Sculpture, Engraving, Animal Figurines, Rectangles, Abstract Art, Animals

Description

RDA

Subject: topical

Cave Paintings; Caves; Prehistoric Art; Sculpture; Engraving; Animal Figurines; Rectangles; Abstract Art; Animals

Type

Article

Genre

serial

Identifier

SFS0067300_00001

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