Event Title

How Poor Self-Perception Feeds into Harmful Self-Handicapping Behaviors

Presenter Information

Angela Perez Cruz

Loading...

Media is loading
 

Comments

Poster Presentation

Please select your campus affiliation

Sarasota

Mentor Information

Cayla Lanier

Description

Although humans have always suffered from self-handicapping behaviors, they have not always been properly understood. There are countless studies about how self-handicapping behaviors affect productivity (both in the workplace and in school), the factors that contribute to self-handicapping behaviors, as well as the possible solutions to such an inescapable blight. This paper aims to explore some of the many factors that contribute to the prevalence of self-handicapping behaviors, particularly in an advanced academic context, and how they can be evaded in favor of academic success. The central claim of this paper is that poor self-perception of one's intelligence, ability to self-regulate, and self-efficacy (among other facets of one's productivity or perceived academic value) will result in an increased reliance on self-handicapping behaviors as a means to avoid or stall confronting one's perceived deficits. Towards the end of this paper, there will be alternative mindsets presented that could resolve issues of poor self-perception by shifting the focus from a student's intelligence or academic performance to their intellectual journey as a learner rather than a letter grade as well as further research proposals.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

How Poor Self-Perception Feeds into Harmful Self-Handicapping Behaviors

Although humans have always suffered from self-handicapping behaviors, they have not always been properly understood. There are countless studies about how self-handicapping behaviors affect productivity (both in the workplace and in school), the factors that contribute to self-handicapping behaviors, as well as the possible solutions to such an inescapable blight. This paper aims to explore some of the many factors that contribute to the prevalence of self-handicapping behaviors, particularly in an advanced academic context, and how they can be evaded in favor of academic success. The central claim of this paper is that poor self-perception of one's intelligence, ability to self-regulate, and self-efficacy (among other facets of one's productivity or perceived academic value) will result in an increased reliance on self-handicapping behaviors as a means to avoid or stall confronting one's perceived deficits. Towards the end of this paper, there will be alternative mindsets presented that could resolve issues of poor self-perception by shifting the focus from a student's intelligence or academic performance to their intellectual journey as a learner rather than a letter grade as well as further research proposals.