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Gender differences in COVID-19 comprehension and compliance in students at the University of South Florida

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Tampa

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Donna Lee Ettel-Gambino

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Literature suggests that females present higher perceptions of danger to COVID-19, while males present higher values of extraversion. No significance was detected in differences of how the pandemic has affected personal life within the context of gender. In this study, attitudes and behaviors of university students towards the latest wave of the COVID-19 Omicron variant were analyzed according to gender. A casual comparative approach was utilized. A multi-variance analysis of variance was conducted using SAS 9.4 (Cary, NC). The independent variable was identified gender. The dependent variables include (1) changes in mental health (2) agreement with CDC guidelines (3) knowledge of someone who died from COVID-19 (4) willingness to share symptoms (5) willingness to isolate if COVID-positive (6) worry about the Omicron variant (7) belief of vaccine effectiveness against the Omicron variant (8) change in behavior according to online information regarding COVID-19. There were four statistically significant findings: proportion of (1) students (26%) who experienced changes in their mental health (p<0.0002) (2) students (13%) who would share if they were experiencing COVID symptoms (p<0.0405) (3) students (68%) who would isolate if COVID-positive (p<0.0001) (4) students (72%) worry about the Omicron variant (p<0.0035). The evidence implies that females are more likely to report a more negative change in mental health, share positive testing status, are more willing to isolate after a positive COVID-19 test and endorse higher rates of concern regarding the Omicron variant. These results suggest a correlation between gender identification and COVID-19 behavior compliance, risk perception, and mental health.

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Gender differences in COVID-19 comprehension and compliance in students at the University of South Florida

Literature suggests that females present higher perceptions of danger to COVID-19, while males present higher values of extraversion. No significance was detected in differences of how the pandemic has affected personal life within the context of gender. In this study, attitudes and behaviors of university students towards the latest wave of the COVID-19 Omicron variant were analyzed according to gender. A casual comparative approach was utilized. A multi-variance analysis of variance was conducted using SAS 9.4 (Cary, NC). The independent variable was identified gender. The dependent variables include (1) changes in mental health (2) agreement with CDC guidelines (3) knowledge of someone who died from COVID-19 (4) willingness to share symptoms (5) willingness to isolate if COVID-positive (6) worry about the Omicron variant (7) belief of vaccine effectiveness against the Omicron variant (8) change in behavior according to online information regarding COVID-19. There were four statistically significant findings: proportion of (1) students (26%) who experienced changes in their mental health (p<0.0002) (2) students (13%) who would share if they were experiencing COVID symptoms (p<0.0405) (3) students (68%) who would isolate if COVID-positive (p<0.0001) (4) students (72%) worry about the Omicron variant (p<0.0035). The evidence implies that females are more likely to report a more negative change in mental health, share positive testing status, are more willing to isolate after a positive COVID-19 test and endorse higher rates of concern regarding the Omicron variant. These results suggest a correlation between gender identification and COVID-19 behavior compliance, risk perception, and mental health.