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Colleges on COVID-19: How College Choice Impacts COVID-19 Related Behaviors in University Students

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Tampa

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Donna Lee Ettel-Gambino

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Introduction Evidence suggests that university students are likely to change their behaviors because of COVID-19. This study was conducted to examine what colleges within the university students are a part of and their COVID-19 related behaviors.

Methods and Materials A multivariance analysis of variance was conducted utilizing SAS 9.4 (Cary, NC). The independent variable was the college to which the student was enrolled. The dependent variables were the students compliance with the following survey questions; 1) concern/worry about Omicron variant; 2) face touching; 3) frequent handwashing; 4) wearing a mask indoors; 5) wearing a mask outdoors; 6) vaccination status; and 7) current with booster.

Results This study resulted in two statistically significant findings. (1) The proportion of students (93%) who report wearing a mask indoors (p<0.04); and (2) the proportion of students (83%) who report washing their hands frequently (p<0.0004). These data also suggest that there is a 27% difference between the proportion of students who wore a mask indoors and outdoors.

Discussion These findings provide contextual evidence that the majority of undergraduate students are following health care policies at the university. Further research may be conducted to analyze how policy information is being shared on college campuses and what communication tactics are effective for understanding between the different colleges.

Conclusion Continuing discussions about health care policies may positively impact the likelihood of college students changing their behaviors in order to maximize healthcare outcomes and simultaneously mitigate spread of COVID-19. Successful communication and understanding of health care policies may allow for more effective implementation of policies.

References Abdallah, D. A., & Lee, C. M. (2021). Social norms and vaccine uptake: College students' COVID vaccination intentions, attitudes, and estimated peer norms and comparisons with influenza vaccine. Vaccine, 39(15), 2060-2067.

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Colleges on COVID-19: How College Choice Impacts COVID-19 Related Behaviors in University Students

Introduction Evidence suggests that university students are likely to change their behaviors because of COVID-19. This study was conducted to examine what colleges within the university students are a part of and their COVID-19 related behaviors.

Methods and Materials A multivariance analysis of variance was conducted utilizing SAS 9.4 (Cary, NC). The independent variable was the college to which the student was enrolled. The dependent variables were the students compliance with the following survey questions; 1) concern/worry about Omicron variant; 2) face touching; 3) frequent handwashing; 4) wearing a mask indoors; 5) wearing a mask outdoors; 6) vaccination status; and 7) current with booster.

Results This study resulted in two statistically significant findings. (1) The proportion of students (93%) who report wearing a mask indoors (p<0.04); and (2) the proportion of students (83%) who report washing their hands frequently (p<0.0004). These data also suggest that there is a 27% difference between the proportion of students who wore a mask indoors and outdoors.

Discussion These findings provide contextual evidence that the majority of undergraduate students are following health care policies at the university. Further research may be conducted to analyze how policy information is being shared on college campuses and what communication tactics are effective for understanding between the different colleges.

Conclusion Continuing discussions about health care policies may positively impact the likelihood of college students changing their behaviors in order to maximize healthcare outcomes and simultaneously mitigate spread of COVID-19. Successful communication and understanding of health care policies may allow for more effective implementation of policies.

References Abdallah, D. A., & Lee, C. M. (2021). Social norms and vaccine uptake: College students' COVID vaccination intentions, attitudes, and estimated peer norms and comparisons with influenza vaccine. Vaccine, 39(15), 2060-2067.