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BASIC LUNAR TASK VARIATIONS AND SAFETY ANALYSIS FOR NASA LUNAR SURFACE OPERATIONS

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Sandra Faragalla

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Tampa

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Stephanie Carey

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Due to the challenges of being in a different gravitational environment such as on the moon as well as dealing with the confinements of performing tasks in an EMU suit, the likelihood of astronauts falling as well as fatigue increases. Astronaut safety may also be affected by differences in task performance and tool use. The purpose of this study was to assess the safety of possible lunar tasks as well as subject task variations by collecting and analyzing motion capture data from subjects performing basic lunar tasks which will be used to create and enhance future biomechanical models. This information can also affect spacesuit design, lunar craft design, and many other mission factors. A Vicon Nexus Motion Capture system with 8 MX T20-S cameras, two AMTI OR6 force plates, and a Full Body Plug-in-Gait marker set (39 markers) was used to collect and analyze subject data for comparison of calculated joint angles and stability. Tasks such as walking, squatting, lifting, hopping, and climbing stairs to mimic egress were completed by subjects. Tasks were chosen based on researching past lunar missions and possible tasks for future missions. Tasks also included using tools such as a shovel, rake, tongs, hammer, and storage container. Some of this data was previously presented at the 2022 Human Research Program Investigators' Workshop conference. Although no subjects fell during data collection, some were fatigued after performing certain tasks such as bending down on one knee or lifting weights, and variations of tool use between subjects were evident.

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BASIC LUNAR TASK VARIATIONS AND SAFETY ANALYSIS FOR NASA LUNAR SURFACE OPERATIONS

Due to the challenges of being in a different gravitational environment such as on the moon as well as dealing with the confinements of performing tasks in an EMU suit, the likelihood of astronauts falling as well as fatigue increases. Astronaut safety may also be affected by differences in task performance and tool use. The purpose of this study was to assess the safety of possible lunar tasks as well as subject task variations by collecting and analyzing motion capture data from subjects performing basic lunar tasks which will be used to create and enhance future biomechanical models. This information can also affect spacesuit design, lunar craft design, and many other mission factors. A Vicon Nexus Motion Capture system with 8 MX T20-S cameras, two AMTI OR6 force plates, and a Full Body Plug-in-Gait marker set (39 markers) was used to collect and analyze subject data for comparison of calculated joint angles and stability. Tasks such as walking, squatting, lifting, hopping, and climbing stairs to mimic egress were completed by subjects. Tasks were chosen based on researching past lunar missions and possible tasks for future missions. Tasks also included using tools such as a shovel, rake, tongs, hammer, and storage container. Some of this data was previously presented at the 2022 Human Research Program Investigators' Workshop conference. Although no subjects fell during data collection, some were fatigued after performing certain tasks such as bending down on one knee or lifting weights, and variations of tool use between subjects were evident.