Event Title

The Major Problem; The Impact of College Major on COVID Precautions

Loading...

Media is loading
 

Comments

Poster Presentation

Please select your campus affiliation

Tampa

Mentor Information

Dr Donna Lee Ettel-Gambino, PhD

Description

Introduction Recent literature indicates that certain demographical traits including major may impact a person's willingness to comply with COVID-19 safety protocols. The purpose of this study is to examine if there are differences among COVID-19 related behaviors between STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) majors and non-STEM majors.

Methods and Materials In conducting this study, a causal comparative approach was utilized. A MANOVA was conducted utilizing SAS 9.4 (Cary, NC). The independent variable was STEM Major status. The dependent variables were: 1) student vaccination status; 2) concern with omicron variant; 3) trust in CDC guidelines and information on the platform; 4) compliance with indoor mask wearing; and 5) compliance with social distancing.

Results This study resulted in two statistically significant findings: 1) the proportion of students (88%), who report being vaccinated (p < 0.009); 2) the proportion of students (93%) who comply with indoor mask wearing (p < 0.001). Discussion These results suggest that major may influence a person's behavior regarding COVID-19. One's status as a STEM major may influence their likelihood to wear a mask and their compliance with immunization. One application of this information could be encouraging institutions to provide students with more information about the benefits of taking precautions against COVID-19. Additional information about the virus may motivate more students to take the necessary precautions against COVID-19.

Conclusions Being a STEM major implies that one would have a wider array of knowledge concerning scientific topics, and it is possible that this affected the way in which they reacted and continue to behave regarding COVID-19.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

The Major Problem; The Impact of College Major on COVID Precautions

Introduction Recent literature indicates that certain demographical traits including major may impact a person's willingness to comply with COVID-19 safety protocols. The purpose of this study is to examine if there are differences among COVID-19 related behaviors between STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) majors and non-STEM majors.

Methods and Materials In conducting this study, a causal comparative approach was utilized. A MANOVA was conducted utilizing SAS 9.4 (Cary, NC). The independent variable was STEM Major status. The dependent variables were: 1) student vaccination status; 2) concern with omicron variant; 3) trust in CDC guidelines and information on the platform; 4) compliance with indoor mask wearing; and 5) compliance with social distancing.

Results This study resulted in two statistically significant findings: 1) the proportion of students (88%), who report being vaccinated (p < 0.009); 2) the proportion of students (93%) who comply with indoor mask wearing (p < 0.001). Discussion These results suggest that major may influence a person's behavior regarding COVID-19. One's status as a STEM major may influence their likelihood to wear a mask and their compliance with immunization. One application of this information could be encouraging institutions to provide students with more information about the benefits of taking precautions against COVID-19. Additional information about the virus may motivate more students to take the necessary precautions against COVID-19.

Conclusions Being a STEM major implies that one would have a wider array of knowledge concerning scientific topics, and it is possible that this affected the way in which they reacted and continue to behave regarding COVID-19.