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The First against COVID-19: Frontline Workers' COVID-19 Related Behaviors in University Students

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Tampa

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Donna Lee Ettel-Gambino

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Previous research has suggested the growing concerns of the emergence of the Omicron variant among frontline workers; specifically, they are concerned with the risk of transmitting the disease to household members. This study was conducted to gain a better understanding among USF students who work on the frontline and their COVID-19 related behaviors. A causal comparative approach was utilized. A multivariance analysis of variance was conducted utilizing SAS 9.4 (Cary, North Carolina). The independent variable was workers who work on and off the frontline. The dependent variables were students' answers to the following questions: 1) concerns with the new Omicron variant; 2) avoidance of touching faces; 3) hand-washing compliance; 4) mask-wearing compliance; 5) immunization status as well as 6) booster status. This study identified two statistically significant findings: overall, students (93%) agreed that washing hands frequently prevents the spread of COVID-19 (p<0.004), and they (92%) had reported wearing masks when they are in an indoor setting (p<0.04). Moreover, these data suggest that there is a 27% difference between the proportion of students who wore a mask indoors and outdoors. Implementation of public policy to better support frontline workers may assist in alleviating stresses during these difficult times. Considering the rise of these invasive variants and the opportunity to prevent further spread to family and loved ones may positively impact their attitude and behavior compliance. Further research may be conducted to examine how mental stress from COVID-19 impact the academics of students who are frontline workers.

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The First against COVID-19: Frontline Workers' COVID-19 Related Behaviors in University Students

Previous research has suggested the growing concerns of the emergence of the Omicron variant among frontline workers; specifically, they are concerned with the risk of transmitting the disease to household members. This study was conducted to gain a better understanding among USF students who work on the frontline and their COVID-19 related behaviors. A causal comparative approach was utilized. A multivariance analysis of variance was conducted utilizing SAS 9.4 (Cary, North Carolina). The independent variable was workers who work on and off the frontline. The dependent variables were students' answers to the following questions: 1) concerns with the new Omicron variant; 2) avoidance of touching faces; 3) hand-washing compliance; 4) mask-wearing compliance; 5) immunization status as well as 6) booster status. This study identified two statistically significant findings: overall, students (93%) agreed that washing hands frequently prevents the spread of COVID-19 (p<0.004), and they (92%) had reported wearing masks when they are in an indoor setting (p<0.04). Moreover, these data suggest that there is a 27% difference between the proportion of students who wore a mask indoors and outdoors. Implementation of public policy to better support frontline workers may assist in alleviating stresses during these difficult times. Considering the rise of these invasive variants and the opportunity to prevent further spread to family and loved ones may positively impact their attitude and behavior compliance. Further research may be conducted to examine how mental stress from COVID-19 impact the academics of students who are frontline workers.