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U.S. Health Care Disparities Among Low-Income Populations

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Samantha Deveaux

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Tampa

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Joe Bohn

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The purpose of this study is to examine the correlation between lack of insurance and increased social needs regarding access and affordability of health care in the United States among lower-income populations. The national health interview survey of 2017-2020 was used to investigate the incidence of adverse health problems in relation to disadvantaged populations. As a result, these populations do not have regular access to preventative care or mental health resources which causes a definite distrust in care providers and the health care system. Research has shown that while one-fifth of disadvantaged adults reported their health as poor, higher-income adults reported an exceptionally low rate of five percent (5%). In regard to mental health, while those with limited income report a psychological distress rate of seven percent (7%), higher-income populaces face a distress rate of one percent (1%). The most glaring research depicts an extremely low insurance rate among low-income of twenty six percent (26%) while higher earning individuals have an uninsured rate of only four percent (4%). This study conclusively evaluates the correlation between low-income populations and adverse health problems as a result of increased social needs and lack of health insurance.

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U.S. Health Care Disparities Among Low-Income Populations

The purpose of this study is to examine the correlation between lack of insurance and increased social needs regarding access and affordability of health care in the United States among lower-income populations. The national health interview survey of 2017-2020 was used to investigate the incidence of adverse health problems in relation to disadvantaged populations. As a result, these populations do not have regular access to preventative care or mental health resources which causes a definite distrust in care providers and the health care system. Research has shown that while one-fifth of disadvantaged adults reported their health as poor, higher-income adults reported an exceptionally low rate of five percent (5%). In regard to mental health, while those with limited income report a psychological distress rate of seven percent (7%), higher-income populaces face a distress rate of one percent (1%). The most glaring research depicts an extremely low insurance rate among low-income of twenty six percent (26%) while higher earning individuals have an uninsured rate of only four percent (4%). This study conclusively evaluates the correlation between low-income populations and adverse health problems as a result of increased social needs and lack of health insurance.