Presentation (Project) Title

A Friend or Foe: How Close Should We Get

Mentor Information

Donna Ettel-Gambino (Judy Genshaft Honors College)

Presentation Format

Event

Abstract

According to the CDC guidelines, social distancing is important to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 as it is transmitted most effectively among people who are within six feet and not wearing face masks. Many individuals who are infected with COVID-19 are asymptomatic and unaware that they can transmit. It is imperative to social distance when possible. When coming into close contact with someone who has COVID-19, it is crucial to self-isolate to prevent further spread of the virus. The purpose of this study is to better understand Judy Genshaft Honors College students’ compliance with social distancing and isolation recommendations should the need arise. The population consisted of students who are enrolled in the Judy Genshaft Honors College at the University of South Florida. A quantitative causal comparative approach was utilized. Initially, a MANOVA was conducted to identify significant trends across groups. The independent variable was the participants’ grade level. The dependent variables were the participants responses to the survey questions regarding: eating out at restaurants, plans for the covid vaccine, plans to self-isolate, and physical distancing compliance. Results of the MANOVA showed statistically significant differences with the criteria of self-isolation willingness and eating out based on grade level. Overall, 97% of Juniors reported a willingness to self-isolate if exposed or infected with COVID-19 whereas only 54% of Sophomores reported being willing to self-isolate. Seniors reported being 25% more likely to eat out at restaurants. An educational intervention may be beneficial to Sophomores who would self-isolate over 50% of the time.

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A Friend or Foe: How Close Should We Get

According to the CDC guidelines, social distancing is important to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 as it is transmitted most effectively among people who are within six feet and not wearing face masks. Many individuals who are infected with COVID-19 are asymptomatic and unaware that they can transmit. It is imperative to social distance when possible. When coming into close contact with someone who has COVID-19, it is crucial to self-isolate to prevent further spread of the virus. The purpose of this study is to better understand Judy Genshaft Honors College students’ compliance with social distancing and isolation recommendations should the need arise. The population consisted of students who are enrolled in the Judy Genshaft Honors College at the University of South Florida. A quantitative causal comparative approach was utilized. Initially, a MANOVA was conducted to identify significant trends across groups. The independent variable was the participants’ grade level. The dependent variables were the participants responses to the survey questions regarding: eating out at restaurants, plans for the covid vaccine, plans to self-isolate, and physical distancing compliance. Results of the MANOVA showed statistically significant differences with the criteria of self-isolation willingness and eating out based on grade level. Overall, 97% of Juniors reported a willingness to self-isolate if exposed or infected with COVID-19 whereas only 54% of Sophomores reported being willing to self-isolate. Seniors reported being 25% more likely to eat out at restaurants. An educational intervention may be beneficial to Sophomores who would self-isolate over 50% of the time.