Presentation (Project) Title

Measurement of Human-Suit Interaction During Extravehicular Activity to Reduce Injury

Mentor Information

Stephanie Carey (College of Engineering)

Presentation Format

Event

Abstract

As astronauts perform various tasks outside a spacecraft, an important tool for survival and a breathable environment in space is the spacesuit. However, while it provides humans with the ability to execute extravehicular operations, spacesuits may interfere with mobility, increase discomfort, and in extreme may even cause injury. To determine countermeasures for these issues, it is important to measure movement within the spacesuit and the extent to which it impedes movement using a force sensing system. In this study, an internal suit is proposed for measuring the interaction of the user and the spacesuit during dynamic motion, to recognize high-force areas. The proposed prototype includes an Arduino Uno microcontroller, force sensing resistors, and an HC-05 Bluetooth module to transfer the data for real time monitoring. A sleeve has been designed for initial testing, involving six sensors. The force sensing system is integrated into a Lycra sleeve for conformable measurement as well as uniform fit. A “low,” “medium,” and “high” force range has been determined to analyze the intensity of contact. Several tasks will be performed to measure the intensity and duration of the interactions between a mock suit and the sleeve. Future work will refine the sleeve’s design in terms of integration of the hardware for optimal comfort and ultimate efficiency. Data collected will be analyzed and processed in efforts to create a 3D model displaying the regions of highest interactions. The microcontroller will be minimized to a smaller unit, such as the Arduino Mega or Nano. Examining the Mediational Role of the Family Environment in the Relation Between Parent and Child Anxiety and Depression Nirzari Patel. Faculty Mentor: Brian E. Bunnell (College of Medicine Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences) Anxiety and depression are two of the most prevalent psychiatric conditions. Several studies have shown that caregiver psychopathology predicts psychopathology in their children. However, little research has examined the mediational role of the family environment on this relation. Thus, the main purpose of this study was to examine whether the relationship between caregiver depression and anxiety and their child’s depression and anxiety respectively, is mediated by the various facets of the family environment. The sample included 316 caregiver-child dyads who completed clinical assessments of anxiety and depression. Children also completed the Family Environment Scale or Child Version of the Family Environment Scale depending on their age, which includes the following subscales: Cohesion, Expressiveness, Conflict, Independence, Achievement Orientation, Intellectual-Cultural Orientation, Active-Recreational Orientation, Moral-Religious Emphasis, Organization, and Control. Results indicated that the relationship between caregiver anxiety and child anxiety was mediated by Family Cohesion and that the relationship between caregiver depression and child depression was mediated by Family Cohesion, Expressiveness, and Active-recreational Orientation. The results of this study suggest that Family Cohesion, Expressiveness, and Active-Recreational Orientation play significant roles in the effect of caregiver psychopathology on that of their children.

Streaming Media

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Measurement of Human-Suit Interaction During Extravehicular Activity to Reduce Injury

As astronauts perform various tasks outside a spacecraft, an important tool for survival and a breathable environment in space is the spacesuit. However, while it provides humans with the ability to execute extravehicular operations, spacesuits may interfere with mobility, increase discomfort, and in extreme may even cause injury. To determine countermeasures for these issues, it is important to measure movement within the spacesuit and the extent to which it impedes movement using a force sensing system. In this study, an internal suit is proposed for measuring the interaction of the user and the spacesuit during dynamic motion, to recognize high-force areas. The proposed prototype includes an Arduino Uno microcontroller, force sensing resistors, and an HC-05 Bluetooth module to transfer the data for real time monitoring. A sleeve has been designed for initial testing, involving six sensors. The force sensing system is integrated into a Lycra sleeve for conformable measurement as well as uniform fit. A “low,” “medium,” and “high” force range has been determined to analyze the intensity of contact. Several tasks will be performed to measure the intensity and duration of the interactions between a mock suit and the sleeve. Future work will refine the sleeve’s design in terms of integration of the hardware for optimal comfort and ultimate efficiency. Data collected will be analyzed and processed in efforts to create a 3D model displaying the regions of highest interactions. The microcontroller will be minimized to a smaller unit, such as the Arduino Mega or Nano. Examining the Mediational Role of the Family Environment in the Relation Between Parent and Child Anxiety and Depression Nirzari Patel. Faculty Mentor: Brian E. Bunnell (College of Medicine Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences) Anxiety and depression are two of the most prevalent psychiatric conditions. Several studies have shown that caregiver psychopathology predicts psychopathology in their children. However, little research has examined the mediational role of the family environment on this relation. Thus, the main purpose of this study was to examine whether the relationship between caregiver depression and anxiety and their child’s depression and anxiety respectively, is mediated by the various facets of the family environment. The sample included 316 caregiver-child dyads who completed clinical assessments of anxiety and depression. Children also completed the Family Environment Scale or Child Version of the Family Environment Scale depending on their age, which includes the following subscales: Cohesion, Expressiveness, Conflict, Independence, Achievement Orientation, Intellectual-Cultural Orientation, Active-Recreational Orientation, Moral-Religious Emphasis, Organization, and Control. Results indicated that the relationship between caregiver anxiety and child anxiety was mediated by Family Cohesion and that the relationship between caregiver depression and child depression was mediated by Family Cohesion, Expressiveness, and Active-recreational Orientation. The results of this study suggest that Family Cohesion, Expressiveness, and Active-Recreational Orientation play significant roles in the effect of caregiver psychopathology on that of their children.