Event Title

Attitudes Towards COVID-19 Based on Political Affiliation, The Big Five, and Gender

Streaming Media

Mentor Information

Lindsey Rodriguez (Department of Psychology)

Description

At the beginning of the pandemic, media coverage on COVID-19 was highly politicized and polarized. Recent studies have shown that more conservative individuals are less likely to see the pandemic as a serious threat. It was hypothesized that males, Republicans, and individuals who are more dogmatic and extraverted have attitudes that align with concern for the economy over the health implications of COVID-19. Participants (N=754; 50% women) completed a survey of COVID-19 attitudes, the Big Five, demographic questions, and dogmatism in Qualtrics Panels. Results showed that individuals who self-reported being more conservative, dogmatic, and extroverted, as well as men, were more likely to have attitudes with concern for the economy over health implications caused by COVID-19. Conversely, those who scored themselves more liberal, neurotic, agreeable, and conscientious were more likely to have concern for the health implications of COVID-19 over the economy. This research can provide the foundation for future research on politicization and polarization within the media about COVID-19 and if this had a causal effect on people to favor the economy over concern for health implications.

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Attitudes Towards COVID-19 Based on Political Affiliation, The Big Five, and Gender

At the beginning of the pandemic, media coverage on COVID-19 was highly politicized and polarized. Recent studies have shown that more conservative individuals are less likely to see the pandemic as a serious threat. It was hypothesized that males, Republicans, and individuals who are more dogmatic and extraverted have attitudes that align with concern for the economy over the health implications of COVID-19. Participants (N=754; 50% women) completed a survey of COVID-19 attitudes, the Big Five, demographic questions, and dogmatism in Qualtrics Panels. Results showed that individuals who self-reported being more conservative, dogmatic, and extroverted, as well as men, were more likely to have attitudes with concern for the economy over health implications caused by COVID-19. Conversely, those who scored themselves more liberal, neurotic, agreeable, and conscientious were more likely to have concern for the health implications of COVID-19 over the economy. This research can provide the foundation for future research on politicization and polarization within the media about COVID-19 and if this had a causal effect on people to favor the economy over concern for health implications.