The Tampa Bay Estuary: An Oral History of Community Collaboration to Restore Ecological Integrity

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Publication Date

January 2015

Abstract

Inspired by the first Earth Day in 1970, Frank M. Dunstan decided to pursue an undergraduate degree in biology at East Stroudsburg University in Pennsylvania. After completing his degree, Dunstan moved to the Tampa Bay area in 1973 and served as warden/biologist for the National Audubon Society's Tampa Bay Sanctuaries' wildlife sanctuaries until 1977. During this time, he published several articles on wetland and avian ecology and conservation. Dunstan continued his environmental work in the Northeast where he held several positions including Urban Forestry Program Coordinator with the New York Department of Environmental Conservation and the Vice President and Director of the Sanctuary Department with the National Audubon Society. During this interview, Dunstan discusses his time in Tampa representing the National Audubon Society. He describes the importance of managing estuarine nesting sites for colonial wading and seabirds. He also describes several challenges he faced, including the effects of the Tampa Harbor Deepening Project, unauthorized bird hunters, and environmental pollution.

Keywords

Wetland ecology, Birds, Florida, Conservation biology, Oral history, Online audio

Description

1 sound file ( 97 minutes) : digital, MPEG4 file + ;

Subject: topical

Wetland ecology; Birds; Conservation biology

Subject: geographic

Florida

Type

Sound

Genre

Oral histories; Interviews

Identifier

T43-00019

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Rights Statement

In Copyright