Title

Effects of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Factors on Aggregation of Physiologically Important Intrinsically Disordered Proteins

Document Type

Book Chapter

Publication Date

2017

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

https://doi.org/10.1016/bs.ircmb.2016.08.011

Abstract

Misfolding and aggregation of proteins and peptides play an important role in a number of diseases as well as in many physiological processes. Many of the proteins that misfold and aggregate in vivo are intrinsically disordered. Protein aggregation is a complex multistep process, and aggregates can significantly differ in morphology, structure, stability, cytotoxicity, and self-propagation ability. The aggregation process is influenced by both intrinsic (e.g., mutations and expression levels) and extrinsic (e.g., polypeptide chain truncation, macromolecular crowding, posttranslational modifications, as well as interaction with metal ions, other small molecules, lipid membranes, and chaperons) factors. This review examines the effect of a variety of these factors on aggregation of physiologically important intrinsically disordered proteins.

Was this content written or created while at USF?

Yes

Citation / Publisher Attribution

Effects of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Factors on Aggregation of Physiologically Important Intrinsically Disordered Proteins, in M. Sandal (Ed.), International Review of Cell and Molecular Biology, v. 329, Elsevier, p. 145-185

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