Title

Caves as microrefugia: Pleistocene phylogeography of the troglophilic North American scorpion Pseudouroctonus reddelli

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Publication Date

January 2014

Abstract

Survival in microrefugia represents an important paradigm in phylogeography for explaining rapid postglacial re-colonization by species in temperate regions. Microrefugia may allow populations to persist in areas where the climatic conditions on the surface have become unfavourable. Caves generally contain stable microclimates and may represent microrefugia for species capable of exploiting both cave and surface habitats (troglophiles). We examine the phylogeography of the troglophilic North American vaejovid scorpion Pseudouroctonus reddelli using 1,993 base pairs of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequence data generated from 12 populations. We use (i) descriptive measures of genetic diversity and population genetics statistics, (ii) reconstructions of phylogeographical structure, spatial diffusion during diversification, and population sizes through time, and (iii) species distribution modelling to test predictions of the hypothesis that caves serve as microrefugia. We compare phylogeographical patterns in P. reddelli with other troglophilic species across the Edwards Plateau karst region of Texas.

Notes

BMC Evolutionary Biology, Vol. 14 (2014).

Keywords

Last Glacial Maximum, Refugia, Species Distribution Model, Scorpiones, Vaejovidae

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1 online resource

Subject: topical

Last Glacial Maximum; Refugia; Species Distribution Model; Scorpiones; Vaejovidae

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Article

Genre

Serial publications

Identifier

SFS0073054_00001

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